Tag: Clinical manifestations

Virulence factors, Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Streptococcus pneumoniae 4.44/5 (9)

Virulence factors, Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae Polysaccharide capsule The capsule is antiphagocytic, inhibiting complement deposition and phagocytosis. 2. Cell wall associated polymers and proteins Teichoic acid – binds to epithelial cells and activates alternative complement pathway Protein adhesion – binds to epithelial cells Peptidogylcan – activates alternative complement pathway Phosphorylcholine – mediates invasion of host cell […]

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Francisella tularensis 4.89/5 (9)

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Francisella tularensis

Pathogenesis of Francisella tularensis Francisella tularensis is carried by many species of wild rodents, rabbits, beavers. Humans become infected by handling the carcasses or skin of infected animals, by inhaling infective aerosols or ingesting contaminated water, through insect vectors and by being bitten by carnivores that have themselves eaten infected animals. Humans are infected by […]

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Corynebacterium diphtheriae 4.88/5 (8)

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

Pathogenesis of Corynebacterium diphtheriae In nature, C diphtheriae occurs in the respiratory tract, in wounds, or on the skin of infected persons or normal carriers. It is spread by droplets or by contact to susceptible individuals; the bacilli then grow on mucous membranes or in skin abrasions, and those that are toxigenic start producing toxin. […]

Virulence factors, Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Listeria monocytogenes 4.55/5 (11)

Listeria monocytogenes

Virulence factors of Listeria monocytogenes 1. Adhesion proteins (Ami, Fbp A, flagellin) Mediate bacterial binding to host cell that contribute to virulence. 2. Listeriolysin O A hemolytic and cytotoxic toxin that allows for survival within phagocytes. 3. Internalin Cell surface protein that induces phagocytosis. 4. Act A Induces actin polymerization on the surface of host cells, […]

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Treponema pallidum 4.65/5 (17)

Pathogenesis and Clinical manifestations of Treponema pallidum

Pathogenesis of Treponema pallidum The two major routes of transmission of Treponema pallidum are sexual and transplacental. Sexual exposure to a person who has an active syphilitic chancre carries a high probability of acquiring syphilis. The organisms enter a susceptible host by penetration of intact mucous membranes or the minute abrasions in the skin surface […]

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